The Low Pay Commission is recommending an increase in the national minimum wage of 30 cents to €9.55 per hour.

An Taoiseach Leo Varadkar welcomed the recommendation which would mean a pay rise of €12 for a 40 hour week to those earning the minimum wage. “This would be a modest increase but it’s ahead of the rate of inflation and average increases in earnings. It would be the fourth increase in the minimum wage since

“This would be a modest increase but it’s ahead of the rate of inflation and average increases in earnings. It would be the fourth increase in the minimum wage since 2011, and the second under this Government, and a further step towards the Programme for Government commitment for a minimum wage of €10.50.”

Mr Varadkar stated, “The Government wants everyone to have an opportunity to share in the ongoing recovery. Increasing the minimum wage will help to achieve that goal by providing an absolute minimum for earnings.  “We intend to formally respond to the report this autumn, including its recommendations regarding employers’ PRSI, in the context of Budget 2018.”  Clare Fine Gael Senator Martin Conway believes this and other supports will greatly benefit lower paid workers in County Clare. Commenting on the recommendation Senator Conway said, “Increasing the minimum wage is just one tool in a wider Government

“We intend to formally respond to the report this autumn, including its recommendations regarding employers’ PRSI, in the context of Budget 2018.”  Clare Fine Gael Senator Martin Conway believes this and other supports will greatly benefit lower paid workers in County Clare. Commenting on the recommendation Senator Conway said, “Increasing the minimum wage is just one tool in a wider Government

Clare Fine Gael Senator Martin Conway believes this and other supports will greatly benefit lower paid workers in County Clare. Commenting on the recommendation Senator Conway said, “Increasing the minimum wage is just one tool in a wider Government

Commenting on the recommendation Senator Conway said, “Increasing the minimum wage is just one tool in a wider Government programme to help the lower paid and incentivise people into work. “Affordable Childcare is on the way this September, which will see up to €1,040 per year for children in

“Affordable Childcare is on the way this September, which will see up to €1,040 per year for children in full-time childcare. The latest data from the Central Statistics Office shows that Ireland is becoming more equal and that poverty is decreasing. “Fine Gael in Government

“Fine Gael in Government recognises that higher levels of public investment in social and economic infrastructure in Co. Clare will improve skills, childcare, and empower our communities. These are the building blocks for more inclusive, fairer and sustainable patterns of economic growth in our society.” Martin Conway concluded, “Economic and social progress go hand in hand. Only a strong economy supporting people at work can pay for the services needed in create a fair society.”

Martin Conway concluded, “Economic and social progress go hand in hand. Only a strong economy supporting people at work can pay for the services needed to create a fair society.”

However, the modest recommendation has been criticised by business group Ibec which claims there is no justification for an increase in the national minimum wage in the current economic climate. Ibec has called on Government to delay the implementation of the recommended increase and has warned that any rise would fuel wage pressure across the economy at a time when businesses are facing acute challenges to competitiveness posed by Brexit. On behalf of employers’ organisation, Maeve McElwee stated: “Ibec supports the national minimum wage in principle, but any increase must be in line with economic realities.  “Current trends provide no justification for such a substantial increase at a time when many Irish sectors are so exposed to competitive threats from Brexit.” Thomas Burke director of Retail Ireland, the Ibec group representing the retail sector, also expressed concern, “there is absolutely no economic basis for a further increase to minimum wages.  “We are extremely disappointed that the Government have welcomed this recommendation of a further increase. Such a rise at this juncture would significantly affect retailers’ ability to remain competitive against a backdrop of falling prices and rising costs within the sector.  “It is very concerning that while retailers continue to cut input costs in order to give consumers the lowest prices possible, Government controlled costs continue to rise. These rising costs are threatening the viability of retail businesses in Ireland, and are in turn jeopardising thousands of jobs in the sector.”

Ibec wants the Government to delay the implementation of the recommended increase and has warned that any rise would fuel wage pressure across the economy at a time when businesses are facing acute challenges to competitiveness posed by Brexit. On behalf of employers’

On behalf of employers’ organisation, Maeve McElwee stated: “Ibec supports the national minimum wage in principle, but any increase must be in line with economic realities.  “Current trends provide no justification for such a substantial increase at a time when many Irish sectors are so exposed to competitive threats from Brexit.” Thomas Burke director of Retail Ireland, the Ibec group representing the retail sector, also expressed concern, “there is absolutely no economic basis for a further increase to minimum wages.  “We are extremely disappointed that the Government

“Current trends provide no justification for such a substantial increase at a time when many Irish sectors are so exposed to competitive threats from Brexit.” Thomas Burke director of Retail Ireland, the Ibec group representing the retail sector, also expressed concern, “there is absolutely no economic basis for a further increase to minimum wages.  “We are extremely disappointed that the Government

Thomas Burke director of Retail Ireland commented, “there is absolutely no economic basis for a further increase to minimum wages.  We are extremely disappointed that the Government have welcomed this recommendation of a further increase. Such a rise at this juncture would significantly affect retailers’ ability to remain competitive against a backdrop of falling prices and rising costs within the sector.  “It is very concerning that while retailers continue to cut input costs in order to give consumers the lowest prices possible, Government controlled costs continue to rise. These rising costs are threatening the viability of retail businesses in Ireland, and are in turn

“Such a rise at this juncture would significantly affect retailers’ ability to remain competitive against a backdrop of falling prices and rising costs within the sector.  “It is very concerning that while retailers continue to cut input costs in order to give consumers the lowest prices possible, Government controlled costs continue to rise. These rising costs are threatening the viability of retail businesses in Ireland, and are in turn

“It is very concerning that while retailers continue to cut input costs in order to give consumers the lowest prices possible, Government controlled costs continue to rise. These rising costs are threatening the viability of retail businesses in Ireland, and are in turn jeopardising thousands of jobs in the sector.”